Terror in the Modern World: The Church in the Target Zone

There is terror everywhere we turn.  It is almost as if we are not able to make a move without hearing of tragedies that ultimately could have been avoided.  We live in a world that is becoming increasingly full of resentment, hate, and consumed with acts of violence.  This is NOT the message that Christ wanted for us.  But make no mistake this is the work of Satan and we must find strength to resist it.  Now we hear of terror all year long, and most of the time the Catholic Church is swift to come to the aid of those affected, as this is what our faith is founded upon—CHARITY!  But when the terror and act of violence comes around the Holiest of Days to the Christian faithful, we must see it for what it is.  It is nothing more than the Satan’s attack on the Christian Faithful.

Creating fear and destruction is Satan’s way at getting to us.  It is a way to distract us from the message of God, brought to us through Christ our Lord.  We must find ways to center ourselves towards the message of the Gospel.  We can do this through unity.  The Unity with our Brothers and Sisters in Christ.  The best way to find this unity is to share in the celebration of the Eucharist.  By attending the celebration, and through participation in the most Holy Sacrifice of the Eucharist, we develop a strong sense of faith.  Through this growth in faith we are able to build up defenses that enable us to guard off and conquer the attacks that Satan sends forth.  It is through this personal development that our witness to Christ becomes seen in the community around us.  It is from that that we evangelize and bring others to the moving and powerful message of God.

Terror will always exist.  It existed in the days of the Early Christians, ending with extreme violence—something that we see echoed even today.  However, we cannot let the terror win.  We must build our defenses through prayer, meditation, and spiritual growth/development.  Only then can we begin to walk the path of defeating the evil and wicked attacks of Satan upon the world.

Please join with me in prayer for those affected by terror and attacks on the Catholic Christian faithful, and Christians all around the world:

St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil.  May God rebuke him we humbly pray; and do thou, O Prince of the Heavenly host, by the power of God, cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls.


Amen.

Notre Dame Cathedral Fire

What took place on April 15, 2019 [USA TAX DAY] in Paris with the partial destruction of the Cathedral is something that is emotionally jarring.  As I sat watching the fire slowly chipping away at the 850-year history of Christianity in France, I couldn’t help but think of how the Catholic Christians of the Parish would continue.  Would they be able to pull through losing something that meant so much to not only the people of France, but people all over the world?  How could this be overcome?IMG_1484

Throughout history we are able to see that whenever tragedy strikes that we are met with a call of “renewal”.  This call of renewal is also met with a call to REBUILD MY CHURCH!  In many cases, if not with all of them, the rebuild my church sentiment is not mean to be something of a structural rebuild [ though in this case that will be done as well], but rather a call to begin repair the spiritual lacking that has occurred among the people.  I think that this case is just one more example of this.  As the fire raged on you couldn’t help but see people banding together in prayer, in the singing of hymns, and embracing each other through tears.  IMG_1485God does in fact have a powerful ability to draw people to what is important.  Of course, the structure of the Cathedral itself is important-but what is more important is the powerful lessons that are found within. The message, mercy, meaning, and love of God is what is important, material things can be replaced.

It will take time to rebuild structurally the church building, but the Church itself is already strong and repairing itself.  What joy we can find in the people coming to pray for the rebuilding.  What beautiful imagery that we have from this event.  God is with us always. God has a plan for all of us. This is a time of RENEWAL. This is a time of REBUILDING.  This is a time of REFLECTION.

Make no Mistake EPIPHANY is the same thing as IMMIGRATION

So, what is Epiphany (also called Three Kings Day, or the Twelfth Night)? In its simplistic form, Epiphany is the immigration of individuals to see a native place. Around about the 4th century, the celebration of Epiphany  was the association of three visiting Magi (what we call the Three Kings) traveling to visit the newborn Jesus in the manger nestled in Bethlehem. With them, as we all know, they bring gifts;  gifts of Gold, Frankincense, and Myrrh.  [The gifts have meanings Gold=Royal Standing; Frankincense=Divine Birth; Myrrh=Mortality.] But even better is the fact that the word EPIPHANY itself is Greek [not Hebrew] meaning “manifestation’.  Already full of irony– the word is not native, but rather a term that was in a sense “immigrated in.”

So where does this lead us to? Well the fact that as the region of Bethlehem was becoming a “sanctuary” for the Magi and even Jesus, the nation itself was in the middle of welcoming refugee and others into their lands. United by their belief that the King of Kings had been born; we see in Christianity’s first moments, the beginnings of what has become Human Days of Dignity–where one group (or one nation) was called upon to welcome others from the outside who bear gifts and have a great gift to bring to this new “nation” united by Christ.

It is fitting that today in the Archdiocese of Louisville we celebrated a Migration Day of Prayer—presided over by Archbishop Joseph Kurtz; and the fact that we also begin to usher in the celebration of Epiphany. As part of those 5 days of Human Dignity (which are scattered thorough this liturgical season) we are called to become more inclusive, to welcome those who come seeking a place of sanctuary as an opportunity to potentially have an encounter with Christ; for it is known through Catholic teaching that we should meet everyone as if they were Christ himself, for we never know if it might be him coming to visit us.

So what should we do? We should welcome all of those into our “nation” that wish to enter. We should find ourselves full of love and embrace for those seeking nothing more than what you or I have. We should realize that it was Mary and Joseph (along with Jesus) that opened up and accepted visitors from all over to live united under the Messiah. We should not be greedy, but instead should offer to share what has been so generously given to us by God, through his one and only Son-born of the Virgin Mary. It is through the acceptance of those who wish to come into the house of the Lord (into our communities) that we may find ourselves close to walking hand-in-hand with Jesus.

So in the end, Epiphany is nothing more than (not minimizing the significance of the event) a remembrance of our call to accept all those that have been called to the feast table by God; and to treat others as we would want to be treated!

So not only Happy Epiphany but HAPPY IMMIGRATION DAY!

Lawrence V. McCrobie

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My New Year’s Resolution

So, year after year I can get online and see how this WILL BE the year that a person will change their life forever. Starting the beginning of this New Year, they will make changes that will permanently alter how they live their life. The new year will be the year for weight loss, saving money, finishing education, buying the new home, being more helpful to people; the list goes on. SO, what is wrong with this? NOTHING! But at the same time, everything is wrong with it.

We, as humans, can do many beautiful things. We are free (as Americans) to make many choices that will, in fact, alter every one of those things listed above. But can we do it ALONE? NOPE! So, my answer is to entirely ditch the notion of creating a New Year’s resolution. Forget it, will not work, and cannot work.

It is the strength that Christ gives us that we can complete any and everything. With that in mind if you wait until January 1 to create your New Year Resolution then you are about 28 days too late (give or take a few days). Why is this? The New Year started for us on December 2, 2017! Talk about being a day late and a dollar short! Think of it this way, to make something happen we have to have faith that Christ will walk the road with us, and that the strength of our Lord God will be with us at every turn to help us through those resolutions we wish to make. Without the help of God, we cannot complete the tasks.

So disclaimer, I did not make a “solid” resolution this year, but instead my goal was to continue doing what I have been doing this past year which is to continue to shape and mold the better me! To do it through living the life Christ has called me to live and to look forward—knowing that none of it is possible without the love and strength given to me by Christ.

So what are your Advent Goals? (even though it has passed you can still have them—its better late than never RIGHT?) Happy 2018 to ALL!

 

In Christ,

Lawrence V. McCrobie

Sunday Music Goers

Each of the Sunday mass goers, as well as the musicians, has a differing opinion on instances in the mass when there should be singing by the assembly. Singing is of utmost importance during the mass and should also be done with consideration to people’s culture and various abilities in each liturgical assembly. The mass begins with an entrance hymn, whose purpose is to enhance unity among those present and introduce their thoughts the liturgical time and also welcome the ministers’ and priests’ procession. One way in which this sense of unity is encouraged is by choosing music that the assembly is conversant with and which is appropriate for opening the celebration. The cantor should ensure that he sings the Liturgy of the Word and the assembly should also sing in response as this is important on Sundays and major feasts. The responses may also be seasonal to suit specific seasons like during Lent and not only limited to singing those set for Sundays only.
Responses such as the Lamb of God, Gloria, and a few other acclamations are regular parts of the Mass and should be sung on every Sunday as they take precedence over others sang at the mass.
During communion, a chant is begun when the priest is receiving the sacrament to express the communicants’ spiritual union by the union of their voices and gladness of their hearts. This is sung during the whole period of administration of sacrament after which the faithful pray quietly or sing a psalm, whichever is desired. A final hymn is not mentioned; however, it is necessary to bring the Eucharist to an end. It is not necessarily as long as the entrance song, and it ends as soon as the procession is out.

Lawrence V. McCrobie

Choir and Participation

The Catholic Church boasts of a complex structure that ensures efficiency and sufficiency of functions aimed at facilitating salvation and the drawing of followers to Christ. The church has adopted a variety of changes over the years with this regard. In the years preceding the Second Vatican Council, most choirs and organists in the Catholic Church appreciate their role as providers of liturgical songs. There was a 1903 publication of the church Inter Sollicitudenes document by Pope St. Pius X  “Motu Proprio”, which encouraged live singing of a variety of responses and Latin chants by the entire congregation. However, a majority of Catholics still experienced a liturgy whereby the songs were done by the choir, or a single singer (cantor); who on several occasions served as the organist.

Vatican II embraced reforms which were a representation of continuity and paradigm shift on how music would and should be used. The 1963 constitution on Sacred Liturgy (CSL) emphasized the use of liturgical songs as well as responses, antiphons, text acclaims and verses. The CSL incorporated a chapter on sacred music, with a declaration that it was of higher value than any other art. The argument was pegged on the formation of crucial parts of the solemn liturgy (No. 112) as the sacred songs firmly bind to the text. The dual purpose of music in the ceremony was also stressed in the constitution. One was to glorify God, and the other, to sanctify the faithful.

Vatican II introduced an aspect of active participation by the whole assembly, hence setting out a new agenda for liturgical musicians. Those charged with the responsibility of revising liturgical books were to prioritize active involvement. The role of the choir and other musicians in the church was reaffirmed, but with the condition that they promote the involvement of the assembly.

Many choirs may have been downgraded, or even eliminated in the years after. Nevertheless, they had a more significant role in the church. The result was a flourishment of a variety of parish choirs from versatile groups to more complex organs like Gospel Choirs, Life Teen Bands, and Chant Ensembles. Different parishes across the globe embraced array regarding church choirs in the quest to fulfill the constitutional requirement. Such groups include children, youth, and traditional choirs as well as a contemporary ensemble.

Church documents on liturgical music reveal a gradual change on the interactions between various choirs or music ministries and the general assembly. Some official records, amongst them, the recently revised Roman Missal General Instruction envision mass celebrations in which the meeting is involved in sung dialogue with priests and live singing with the choir or cantor. The documents have the presumption that the liturgy is a sung celebration with the priest and choir/cantor assigned different roles. The choir’s singing forms an integral part of the celebration and should, therefore, be to the plans of the prayers or song of the whole congregation. The situation has posed the challenge of fostering active participation by the congregants while still ensuring the utmost quality of music.

Lawrence V. McCrobie